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Course Structure

Humanitas College has thoroughly overhauled the program for liberal arts education at Kyung Hee University and established a new set of core courses, introduced distribution requirements, and increased the emphasis on civic education and community service. The course offerings fall into four sections: core courses, distribution requirements, required fundamentals, and electives. Core courses are compulsory subjects that all freshmen must take. Students are required to take five out of seven distribution requirement courses. The required fundamentals inculcate in the student the basic abilities necessary to study at the university. Electives may be taken at the student's discretion.

※ Students entering the university in 2011 and afterwards are to complete liberal arts education courses based on the following basic structure (For those who entered in 2010 or before, refer to ‘Transitional measures’).

Basic structure and credits of liberal arts education courses

Classification Course Credits Year to take Remarks
Core courses
(Civilizations in a Global Context I, II)
Human Quest for Values 3 1st year Compulsory in the 1st semester of the 1st year
The World We Live In 3 1st year Compulsory in the 2nd semester of the 1st year
Sub total 6 -
Required fundamentals
- Basic skills (Writing, English)
- Civic education
Writing 1 2 1st year Compulsory in the 1st year
(Two credits, three hours)
Writing 2 2 2nd year Compulsory in the 2nd year
(Two credits, three hours)
English 1 2 1st year Compulsory in the 1st year
(Two credits, three hours)
English 2 2 1st or 2nd year Compulsory in the 1st or 2nd year
(Two credits, three hours)
Civic education 3 1st year Compulsory in the 1st year
(theoretical class + Community service)
Sub total 11 or more -
Distribution requirements
- Life, Body, & Symbiotic Systems
- Nature, Universe, Matter, & Technology
- Meaning, Symbols, & Empathy
- Society, Community, Nation, & Market
- Peace, Nonviolence, & Ethical Reasoning
- History, Culture, & Communication
- Logic, Analysis, & Mathematical Reasoning
Required to select five out of seven categories 15 or more All years Three credits for three hours in each course
Sub total 15 or more -
Electives Electives 3 or more All years Select among foreign languages, physical education, arts, and other categories
Sub total 3 or more -
Total liberal arts education credits 35 or more Up to 56 credits can be recognized

※ “Major-related liberal arts”, which had been part of the liberal arts education program until 2010, is to be changed to “basics for the major” and run as part of the major program of the appropriate college or department starting in 2011. The basic structure of liberal arts education courses no longer indicates courses under the previous major-related liberal arts classification.

Things to bear in mind when registering for courses

Compulsory in the second semester of the first year

This course focuses on the human world that we inhabit and all the complexities and contradictions of the contemporary experience. The central problematic for the course modernity and its legacy. The course explores the concepts most dominant among the ideologies and institutions that constitute the fields of politics, economy, society, and culture in the modern world. Topics such as democracy, human rights, freedom of thought and expression, separation of church and state, secularism, the free market, free trade, science, and industrial technology are explained in their historical context."The World We Live In" identifies unique achievements of man and focuses on that political, social, and cultural issues they have helped to resolve, and which dilemmas they have introduced.The course will consider whether the solutions offered in the modern period are still effective today. Moreover, the modern period has left us with legacies that have caused serious challenges in our age.What are the problems generated by our civilization? Can our current civilization resolve those problems? What solutions can we imagine to address the current crisis? What are our responsibilities in this modern society? The goal of "The World We Live In" is to pose these pressing questions to students and encourage them to search for their own answers.The following questions will be posed to students :

  • Core courses 1 and 2 are to be taken in the first and second semester of the first year, respectively.
  • For distribution requirements, at least five courses in five out of seven categories (a total of 15 credits) are to be taken throughout the four years.
  • Writing 1 is to be take in the first or second semester of the first year and Writing 2 in the first or second semester of the second year.
  • English 1 is to be taken in the first or second semester of the first year and English 2 in the first or second semester of the first or second year.
    - English 1 and 2 courses are offered at four levels (basic, intermediate, advanced, and upper advanced), and students are assigned to the levels most appropriate for them depending on the results of a diagnostic test.
  • Civic education is to be taken in the first or second semester of the first year.




Core Course

Core Course 1 : Civilizations in a Global Context: "The Human Quest for Values"(3 credits, 3 hours)

Compulsory in the first semester of the first year

"What values are important to humans?" "How have such values have been derived and upheld?" "Which values have stood the test of time through the rise and fall of multiple civilizations?" and "What values are still important to humans?" The course takes the student through a selection of critical texts from the Western and Eastern canons.The guided readings demonstrate how humans have ceaselessly rediscovered and reinvented themselves in the process of pursuing their values. From the search for the value of truth emerged the field of philosophy; from the pursuit of the value of facts grew the field of science, and from the pursuit of the value of meaning came poetry.From that intellectual evolution of values emerged people who would sacrifice their lives for such values as freedom, justice, and equality. By learning about the important moments in the history of ideas and values, students gain a better understanding of humanity and engage with the fundamental question: "What makes humans human?" This course takes a cross-disciplinary approach encompassing literature, history, philosophy and the social sciences, and natural sciences so as to induce in students an understanding of humanity. Ultimately, the course encourages the student to consider which values he or she holds dearest, and why. The following questions are raised in the course of discussion :

  • What values has humanity created and pursued?
  • How do humans invent and reinvent their culture and values?
  • How has humanity affixed significance and purpose to life?
  • How has science contributed to the creation of value systems?
  • What distinguishes humans from animals?
  • What values are important to me?
  • Are there values or traditions I would be willing to die for?


Core Course 2 : Civilizations in a Global Context II: "The World We Live In" (3 credits, 3 hours)

Compulsory in the second semester of the first year

"The World We Live In" identifies unique achievements of man and focuses on that political, social, and cultural issues they have helped to resolve, and which dilemmas they have introduced.The course will consider whether the solutions offered in the modern period are still effective today. Moreover, the modern period has left us with legacies that have caused serious challenges in our age.What are the problems generated by our civilization? Can our current civilization resolve those problems? What solutions can we imagine to address the current crisis? What are our responsibilities in this modern society? The goal of "The World We Live In" is to pose these pressing questions to students and encourage them to search for their own answers.The following questions will be posed to students :

  • How did the ideas introduced by philosophers of the Enlightenment change the world?
  • How was modern civilization able to break out of the political, economic, and social dilemmas of the previous civilization?
  • How did science and technology contribute to the formation of the contemporary world?
  • What complaints did modern civilization create?
  • How have East Asian countries respond to the challenges of modernity?
  • Is it accurate to speak of a "clash of civilizations?"
  • What are the problems of the contemporary world?



Distribution Requirements

The Humanitas liberal arts education program consists of seven thematic categories that define field of knowledge for undergraduate students to study and master. The program includes a distribution requirements system that requires students to complete courses in at least five of the seven of the categories. This system insures both continuity between disciplines and a broad perspective consistent with the liberal arts education.

Of utmost importance is the interdisciplinarity included within the core courses. The seven thematic categories are not narrow professional majors but deal with themes in humanity, society, nature, culture, art and ethics. For instance, Thematic Category 1,"Life, the Body, and Symbiotic Systems," goes beyond the natural sciences to include themes from the humanities and social sciences. This is because "Life, the Body, and Symbiotic Systems" has far greater intellectual and social implications. Interdisciplinary education is at the heart of the liberal arts education, suggesting new comparisons and presenting clues for future exploration.

The courses associated with the distribution requirements emphasize reading and writing using the appropriate texts for each category. Engagement in society, field observation, practice and research ensures practical linkage between lectures and the field. This approach helps students to assess the present conditions of society, see the implications of the issues raised first-hand, and develop imagination necessary to devise solutions.Each thematic category is covered by a wide selection of courses. Five of the seven required categories can be taken anytime while enrolled at the university. A total of 15 credits or more should be taken from these course categories in the four years of undergraduate education.


The seven thematic categories of distribution requirements at Humanitas College are as follows :
  • Life, the Body, and Symbiotic Systems
  • Nature, Universe, Matter, and Technology
  • Meaning, Symbols, and Empathy
  • Society, Community, Nation, and Market
  • Peace, Nonviolence, and Ethical Reasoning
  • World, Culture, and Communication
  • Logic, Analysis, and Mathematical Reasoning



Required Fundamentals

Writing 1 : "Writing for Myself" (2 credits, 3 hours)

Compulsory in the first year

Introspection about one's own life and the evaluation of one's relationships with others in a new context are critical as students launch their studies in a true sense. Being able to express oneself, observe one's surroundings, and deeply empathize with others are important goals in education. The writing instruction (Korean language) at Humanitas College is unique in that it encourages students to write from their concrete experiences.

In the course, students reflect their experiences and uncover overlooked aspects of their personal history. Such efforts are the foundation for creative writing, analytical skills, and critical thinking.

As part of a continuing program of systematic training in writing, freshmen must take Writing 1: "Writing for Myself." The introspective writing assignments lead to self-discovery, increased self-respect and a new sense of perspective. Students learn to express their own ideas with confidence and acquire increased interest in writing. Writing helps them to redefine relationships between themselves and others.

Humanitas College assumes that feedback from instructors in the form of comments on papers and consultation is the most important element in teaching writing. Students have direct interaction with instructors and learn to craft a paper. The classes have both online and offline components. Students have their writings evaluated by peers and work together to develop skills in reading, analysis and criticism.


Writing 2 : "Writing for the World" (2 credits, 3 hours)

Compulsory in the second year

Sophomores take Writing 2: Writing for the World, which focuses on more academic and specialized writing about society and others. Writing 2 is about critical writing. It is an advanced writing course where students extensively reflect intellectual shocks they received in their studies like the core courses and civic education and social action courses. They critically and logically analyze specific themes or phenomena. And finally they participate in academic discussion.

Humanitas College regards feedback between instructors and students in such forms as correction and consultation as one of the most important elements of writing instruction. To ensure that feedback indeed occurs, each class is limited to only 20 students. This is the best domestic environment for writing instruction. The classes are given both online and offline, and students show their writings to others and evaluate others' writings together to develop skills to read, analyze, and criticize on their own.


English 1 : "The Fundamentals of Communications in English" (2 credits, 3 hours)

Compulsory in the first year

English, it is essential for the individual with an international perspective. A strong initial introduction is critical to success in all academic fields.English education at Humanitas College is comprehensive in nature. As part of our effort to build up English reading and discussion skills, students take a placement test to determine whether they should be in the basic, intermediate, advanced, or upper advanced classes for English 1. Students closely analyze varied texts in their specific historical or cultural context. The course promotes the development of creative thinking and critical judgement through successive individual presentations and English group discussions.Students are encouraged to actively participate in the classes and develop the skills to reason in English by visiting the English clinic outside the classes and by participating in various English-language intramural activities.


English 2 : "Communication in English" (2 credits, 3 hours)

Compulsory in the first two years

English 2 offers extensive experience in reading writing and speaking in English on complex topics with a focus on writing and oral presentation skills. The course builds on the reading and discussion skills developed in English 1. Students learn to write effectively in English for a variety of situations. Individual and group presentations increase creative writing and specialized presentation skills.


Civic Education (3 credits, 3 hours)

Compulsory in the first year

Since its foundation, Kyung Hee University has placed democratic ideals for living and education at the center and made its mission the creation of a peaceful, cultured world. Teaching is about nurturing citizens with an international perspective and a global sense of responsibility. Contributing to creating a healthy society is one of the university's primary responsibilities. We can achieve that goal best by training responsible, and compassionate citizens Nurturing such citizens is a pressing task in university education today. The Humanitas liberal arts education program offers civic education with current and substantial content that will make our graduates good citizens. Such training has gone from obscurity to a central place among required fundamentals.

Our society needs responsible citizens who embody three major characteristics: 1) rational, critical-thinking citizens who have the competency and the commitment to sustain and develop democracy; 2) compassionate neighbors who have the virtues necessary to maintain a community built on trust, empathy, volunteerism and a commitment to a shared commons; and 3) global citizens who recognize their responsibilities to both the nation and the world.

Universities cannot turn a blind eye to critical task. We will have failed in our instruction if students do not have a strong sense of their responsibilities.Universities must provide effective civic education to make students participants in our future. Our graduates will be ready to address different priorities of citizenship of a nation and member of the international community. Values like loyalty, patriotism, and identity are positive values for national citizenship but can inhibit commitment to critical responsibility on a global scale. Proper education is critical to reconcile local interests and international imperatives.

More than ever before, there is a desperate need for an international mind-set, a volunteer spirit, and a solidarity of all mankind. We must inculcate open-mindedness, respect for others and other cultures, and international cooperation to resolve the challenges facing the international community. It is a primary responsibility of the university to generate trustworthy and responsible citizens with the abilities, and the virtues, necessary to thrive in today's world.

Citizens must be able to rationally analyze facts and arrive at reasonable judgments and decisions concerning the problems encountered in life. They must also have the ethical foundations necessary to put knowledge into action for the greatest good. They must be able to understand psychological issues and view political, social, and cultural issues from multiple perspectives. The entire liberal arts education program of Humanitas College is geared towards producing persons with these abilities. This civic education course, in particular, is designed to cultivate social, political, ethical, and intellectual abilities and virtues now required of citizens at home and abroad.Some of the points stressed in the course :


Some of the points stressed in the course :
  • Witness and understand various social issues on location
  • Opportunities to develop the imagination and the capacity to solve problems
  • Familiarity with social reality and the international environment
  • Expanding one's horizons
  • Develop a network for future cooperation
  • Develop multiple venues for engagement in society leading to opportunities for employment and entrepreneurship
  • Development an open and global mind
  • Development of ability to resolve conflicts


Community Service (One non-academic credit, up to three credits possible)

Compulsory in the first year

Kyung Hee University has traditionally emphasized the importance of social responsibility and community service. In keeping with this long tradition, the Humanitas College encourages students to engage in volunteer community service while enrolled at the university. Students' volunteer work is not merely an act of kindness. Community service serves a clear educational function in the following three respects:

  1. Making a better world - Rather than regarding an education as a personal possession, university students are encouraged to share some of their time, their skills and their unique talents for the benefit of people in need, starting with right around them. Such sharing establishes a harmonious community and deepens the student's understanding of his or her learning. Social responsibility must go hand in hand with education. A truly educated citizen never forgets his/her social responsibility.

  2. Self-transformation - Community service can be a transformative experience. It helps change the values of volunteers and their view of the world. Community service helps to complete the educative process for the individual. Working for others brings our connections with others into focus, raising our experience to a higher plane, and thereby increasing one's ethical awareness.

  3. Expanding Experience ; Understanding the World - Students better understand social reality through volunteer activities at home and abroad that bring them face to face with issues they read about in books. Community service affords them opportunities to meet people from different backgrounds while participating in international organizations and non-governmental organizations at home and abroad. Volunteer activities with the international community are an education about the world in themselves. Such valuable experiences cannot be gained in the classroom.

Some benefits of community service :
  • Learning : Witnessing conditions first-hand and understanding social and global issues in the field
  • Development of the imagination and the ability to resolve issues : “How would I resolve these issues?" "what are my alternatives?" and "what can I do to make the world a better place?"
  • Familiarity with social reality and the international environment :"What is happening here and there, and why?"
  • Expansion of horizons : Learning new knowledge about the world and being exposed to new perspectives
  • Formation of a human network for cooperation : “Who is doing what and where?” and “what can I do with them in the future?"
  • Job or business opportunities
  • Cultivation of an open and global mind
  • Improving one's ability to mediate conflicts

Humanitas College assumes a strong connection between civic education and community service as part of social action to help cultivate global leaders who think in a systematic and responsible way.




Electives

Students are free to choose from elective classes that do not fit into this set of required courses. Electives include foreign languages, physical education, and the arts as well as practical courses such as media, design, architecture, and modeling.

Foreign languages : Languages other than English

Physical education : Physical education activities and sports programs

Arts : Cultural and art courses, special lectures, creative and practical courses

Others : Special Humanitas programs and training in computer skills, etc.




Guidance on liberal arts education courses

*The following transitional measures apply to students who entered the university in 2010 or earlier.
*Separate explanations are given for the liberal arts education programs offered at the Seoul and Global campuses because of the differences between them.


1. Required liberal arts education credits (Common)
  • Students are to complete liberal arts education courses designated at the time of entrance and earn the required number of credits for each classification.
  • If such courses are no longer offered due to reorganization, they are to take courses in classifications designated as replacements to earn the required number of credits for each classification. This does not mean that all the courses of a replacement classification need to be completed.
  • Lectures are to be given according to the new liberal arts education program from the first semester of 2011 and students entering in 2010 or before shall take courses under the new program.
  • If students entering in 2010 or before have not earned required liberal arts education credits under the previous program, they can earn them under the new program. The number of basic required credits is that designated in the program for 2003 and previous years for students who entered in 2003 or earlier and that designated in the year of entrance for students entering in 2004 to 2010.
  • When changing department, liberal arts education credits for different classifications earned in the previous college (department) can be transferred and credited for those required in the new college (department).
  • When transferring between campuses, students can have previously-earned liberal arts education credits recognized for the appropriate course classifications at the new campus without distinction of courses (except for the previous “major-related liberal arts” and “basics for the major”). This applies only to liberal arts education courses taken before transfer.


2. Minimum required credits and replacement classifications for different entering years


◇ Seoul campus

(1) Replacement classifications in liberal arts education for students entering in 2008 to 2010

Previous classifications Minimum credits Replacement classifications Remarks
Basic liberal arts Culture, World, and the Leader 2 or more Courses under electives:
Leaders & Leadership,Communication and Creativity, Civic Education, Special Humanitas Lectures 1, 2 & 3, and Community Service 1
* When recognized for the Culture, World, and the Leader classification, courses cannot be recognized twice for their original classification.
Thinking and Expression
- Previously writing, and reading and discussion
6 Writing 1 & 2, basic skills of required fundamentals
(2 credits each) or core courses
* When completing Writing 1 & 2 (two credits each), three credits are recognized, respectively. Three credits are deducted from the number of credits that can be earned for each case.
Foreign Language
- Previously English reading and discussion, and English writing
6 English 1 & 2, basic skills of required fundamentals
(2 credits each)
* When completing English 1 & 2 (two credits each), three credits are recognized, respectively. Three credits are deducted from the number of credits that can be earned for each case.
Compre
- hensive liberal arts
Basic categories Humancategory 15 or more Distribution requirements,electives * No distinction for classification
Social category
Nature category
Focused category
Elective category
Major
-related liberal arts
Liberal arts for each department
(No. of credits designated for each major)
6 or more Basics for the major * These subjects are moved from liberal arts education to the major program in 2011 and afterwards.
* Refer to each major program for detailed rules.

[Explanation]
* Students entering in 2008 to 2010 are to earn the minimum number of credits for each classification in the above table.
* If a student does not have enough credits in any classification, additional credits can be earned under the new liberal arts education program by taking replacement courses in the above table.
* If a student does not have enough credits in Thinking and Expression and Foreign Language, the student can take Writing 1 & 2 or core courses AND English 1 & 2, respectively to satisfy the required number of credits. Though Writing 1 & 2 and English 1 & 2 give two credits each (for three hours a week), three credits are given when completed by students entering in 2010 or before. Three credits are deducted from the number of credits that can be earned.
* If a student has too few credits for comprehensive liberal arts: Credits can be earned by selecting a course/s from distribution requirements and electives without distinction of classification.
* If a student has too few credits for major-related liberal arts: Credits can be earned by selecting a course/s from basics for major as required by a major program’s detailed rules.


(2) Replacement classifications in liberal arts education for students entering in 2004 to 2007

Previous classifications (credits) Minimum credits Replacement classifications Remarks
Essential liberal arts - Thinking and Expression (3)
- Foreign Language (6)
: University-level English, specific-purpose English conversation
- Computerization (3)
- Culture, World, and the Leader (1)
: What Is Leadership, Community Service
13 * From 2011: Appropriate courses under core courses, required fundamentals and electives (Leaders & Leadership, Communication and Creativity, Civic Education, Special Humanitas Lectures 1, 2 & 3, and Community Service 1
* 2008 to 2010: Basic liberal arts
* Recommended to choose courses according to classifications
* When completing Writing 1 & 2 and English 1 & 2 (two credits each), three credits are recognized, respectively. Three credits are deducted from the number of credits that can be earned for each case.
Liberal arts by category - Category 1 Literature and language (3)
- 2 History, philosophy, and culture (3)
- 3 Society and economy (3)
- 4 Nature and science (3)
- 5 Art and health (1 to 3)
13 * From 2011: Distribution requirements or electives
* 2008 to 2010: Comprehensive liberal arts
* No distinction for classification/category
Liberal arts by track - Humanities track
- Society track
- Science track
- Medicine & pharmacy track
- Arts track
9 or more * From 2011: Basics for the major
* 2008~2010: Major-related liberal arts
* These subjects are moved from liberal arts education to the major program in 2011 and afterwards.
* Refer to each major program for detailed rules (Liberal arts education credits from other tracks included)

[Explanation]
* Students entering in 2004 to 2007 are to earn no less than 13 credits in essential liberal arts, 13 in liberal arts by category, and the number of credits by track as required by the rules of each major program.
* Credit calculation for essential liberal arts: The number of credits is calculated by adding up credits already earned in essential liberal arts; credits from basic liberal arts in 2008 to 2010; and credits to be earned from core courses, required fundamentals, and electives in 2011 and going forward. It is recommended to distinguish between classifications as much as possible.
* Credit calculation for liberal arts by category: The number of credits is calculated by adding up credits already earned in liberal arts by category; credits from comprehensive liberal arts in 2008 to 2010; and credits to be earned from distribution requirements and electives in 2011 and going forward. There is no reason to distinguish between classifications. However, it is recommended to evenly choose from the two classifications.
* Credit calculation for liberal arts by track: The number of credits is calculated by adding up credits already earned in liberal arts by track; credits from major-related liberal arts in 2008 to 2010; and credits to be earned from basics for the major in 2011 and going forward. The minimum number includes credits from other tracks of liberal arts. Credits from other tracks of liberal arts are also to be earned by replacement courses.
* When Writing 1 & 2 or English 1 & 2 is taken in replacement of essential liberal arts: Though Writing 1 & 2 and English 1 & 2 give two credits each (for three hours a week), three credits are given when completed by students entering in 2010 or before. Three credits are deducted from the number of credits that can be earned.


(3) Replacement classifications in liberal arts education for students entering in 2003 and before

Previous classifications (credits) Minimum credits Replacement credits Remarks
Compulsory liberal arts
- Category 2: English Conversation 1&2, English Writing 1&2 (3)
- Category 8: Introduction to Computer Science, Computer at Work, Programing, and Database (3)
30 * From 2011: Core courses, required fundamentals, distribution requirements, electives
* 2008∼2010: Basic liberal arts, comprehensive liberal arts * 2004∼2007: Essential liberal arts, liberal arts by category
* Recommended to choose courses according to classifications
* Basic structure of old elective liberal arts
- CRS : Category 2 & 8 (3 credits each)
- Category 1 to 8: 3 credits each (24 credits in total)
Elective liberal arts
- Category 1: Korean language and writing (3)
- Category 2: Foreign language and international culture (3)
- Category 3: Literature and art (3)
- Category 4: History and philosophy (3)
- Category 5: Humans and society (3)
- Category 6: Healthy life (3) - Category 7: Nature and the environment (3)
- Category 8: Science and technology (3)
Major-related liberal arts 6 or more * From 2011: Basics for the major
* 2008~2010 : Major-related liberal arts
* 2004~2007: Liberal arts by track
* These subjects are moved from liberal arts education to the major program in 2011 and afterwards.
* Refer to each major program for detailed rules

[Explanation]
* Students entering in 2003 and before are to earn 30 credits in liberal arts and the number of credits in major-related liberal arts as required by the rules of each major program.
* Credit calculation for major-related liberal arts: The number of credits is calculated by adding up credits earned in liberal arts by track under the 2004 to 2007 program, major-related liberal arts under the 2008 to 2010 program, and basics for the major under the 2011 program.


◇ Global campus


[Common]
* Students who entered or transferred to the university in 2003 or before are no longer required to take English and computer science courses from among the CRS courses from the liberal arts education program for 2003 and previous years. Nevertheless, they shall earn credits under the graduation certification system of the appropriate college.
* Students can withdraw credits if the courses they intended to retake are no longer offered under the new liberal arts education program in 2011.
* The rector of the College of Liberal Arts may as deemed necessary specify other transitional rules on students who entered in 2010 or before.
* The elective overnight program is offered only to students of the 2008 and later entering classes.


(1) Replacement classifications in liberal arts education for students entering in 2008 to 2010

Previous classifications Minimum credits Replacement classifications Remarks
Basic liberal arts Culture, World, and the Leader 2 Courses under electives: Freshmen Seminar 1 (compulsory), What Is Leadership?, Leaders & Leadership, Global Leadership (for international students), Civic Education, and Special Humanitas Lectures 1, 2 & 3 ▶At least two credits to be earned from the appropriate courses including Freshmen Seminar 1
Thinking and Expression 6 Required fundamentals: Writing 1 &2 and core courses
(Previously writing, and reading and discussion)
※ Courses cannot be retaken as they are not the same.
※ Students of the 2010 and previous entering classes can earn three credits for each of Writing 1&2 and English 1&2
Foreign Language 6 Required fundamentals: English 1 & 2
(Previously Global English 1 &2)
Compre- hensive liberal arts Basic categories Human category 6
(Can choose 2)
Distribution requirements,
electives
No less than 12 credits can be freely taken
Social category
Nature category
Focused category 6
Elective category (Overnight program) 4 Elective
(Freshmen Seminar 2, foreign languages, physical education, arts, and others)
If enrolled students do not have sufficient credits in the overnight program, they can earn them from any of the elective courses.
(★ Freshmen Seminar 2 is required)

[Explanation]
* In principle, the classification of a completed course should be that of the liberal arts education program of the year when the course is completed.
* Students entering in 2008 to 2010 are to earn 36 to 60 credits under the classifications of the 2008 program (No less than 14 credits in basic liberal arts, no less than 16 credits in comprehensive liberal arts, and no less than 6 credits in major-related liberal arts designated by each college/department).
* Earning credits under the new liberal arts education program
  • 1) Basic liberal arts
    - When intending to earn no less than 14 credits in basic liberal arts defined in the 2008 program, a course/s of basic skills under the 2011 program shall be taken.
    - Nevertheless, those who failed to take a course in the Culture, the World, and Leader category for basic liberal arts credits are to take appropriate courses among the electives of the 2011 program or the civic education course (three credits).
    - Credits from core courses are recognized as credits for the Thinking and Expression category.
    - When Writing 1 & 2 or English 1 & 2 is completed, three credits are given for each case.
  • 2) Comprehensive liberal arts
    - Basic and focused category
    When intending to earn 12 credits in the basic and focused categories (six each) as defined in the 2008 program, a course/s of distribution requirements or electives under the 2011 program without distinction of classification shall be taken.
    - Elective category (Overnight program)
    When intending to earn additional needed credits for the elective overnight program (which requires four) as defined in the 2008 program, a course/s of electives under the 2011 program without distinction of classification shall be taken. In this case, Freshmen Seminar 2 shall be compulsorily taken and the remaining thee credits may be earned without distinction of classification.
  • 3) Major-related liberal arts (Previously liberal arts by track)
    - Major-related liberal arts are excluded from liberal arts education in the 2011 program. Nevertheless, the courses of major-related liberal arts are offered as before and with the same credits. Required credits and courses are to be taken as designated by college or major.
* Recognition for classification under the 2011 program
  • - Credits earned in required fundamentals except for civic education and core courses under the 2011 program can be recognized as credits for basic liberal arts under the 2008 program according to classification.
  • - Credits earned in distribution requirements or electives under the 2011 program can be recognized as credits for comprehensive liberal arts under the 2008 program according to classification.
  • - Credits earned in major-related liberal arts for each department under the 2011 program can be recognized as credits for major-related liberal arts under the 2008 program.



(2) Replacement classifications in liberal arts education for students entering in 2004 to 2007

Previous classifications (credits) Minimum credits Replacement classifications Remarks
Essential liberal arts Culture, World and the Leader 1~2 What Is Leadership?, Civic Education, and Special Humanitas Lectures 1, 2 & 3, and Community Service 1 At least one credit is to be earned from the courses of What Is Leadership?, Civic Education, and Special Humanitas Lectures 1, 2 & 3, and Community Service 1.
Thinking and Expression 3 Writing 1 & 2 (basic skills of required fundamentals) or core courses
- Previously writing, and reading and discussion
※ Courses cannot be retaken as they are not the same.
※ Students of the 2010 and previous entering classes can earn three credits for each of Writing 1&2 and English 1&2
Foreign Language 6 English 1 & 2 (basic skills of required fundamentals)
- Previously Global English 1&2
Computerization 3 The requirement for students of the classes of 2004 to 2007 to take a computerization course is abolished
Liberal arts by category - Category 1 Literature and language (3)
- 2 History, philosophy, and culture (3)
- 3 Society and economy(3)
- 4 Nature and science(3)
- 5 Art and health (1 to 2)
13 * 2011 and afterwards : Distribution requirements or electives
* 2008~2010 : Comprehensive liberal arts
* No distinction for classification

[Explanation]
* In principle, the classification of a completed course should be that of the liberal arts education program of the year when the course is completed.
* Students entering in 2004 to 2007 are to earn 35 to 56 credits under the classifications of the 2004 to 2007 program (No less than ten credits in essential liberal arts (computerization course abolished), no less than 13 credits in liberal arts by category, and nine to 27 credits in liberal arts by track).
* Earning credits under the new liberal arts education program
  • 1) Essential liberal arts
    - When intending to earn no less than 13 credits in essential liberal arts as defined in the 2004 to 2007 program, a course/s of basic skills under the 2011 program shall be taken.
    - Nevertheless, those who failed to take a course in the Culture, the World, and Leader category for basic liberal arts credits are to take appropriate courses among the electives of the 2011 program or the civic education course.
    - Credits from core courses are recognized as credits for the Thinking and Expression category.
    - Three credits for a computerization course from the previous essential liberal arts classification is abolished.
    - When Writing 1 & 2 or English 1 & 2 is completed, three credits are given for each case.
  • 2) Liberal arts by category
    - When intending to earn at least 13 credits in liberal arts by category as defined in the 2004 to 2007 program, a course/s of distribution requirements or electives under the 2011 program shall be taken.
  • 3) Major-related liberal arts (Previously liberal arts by track)
    - Major-related liberal arts are excluded from liberal arts education in the 2011 program. Nevertheless, the courses of major-related liberal arts are offered as before and with the same credits. Required credits and courses are to be taken as designated by college or major.
* Recognition for classification under the 2011 program
  • - Credits earned in required fundamentals except for civic education and core courses under the 2011 program can be recognized as credits for essential liberal arts under the 2004 to 2007 program according to classification.
  • - Credits earned in distribution requirements or electives under the 2011 program can be recognized as credits for liberal arts by category under the 2004 to 2007 program.
  • - Credits earned in major-related liberal arts for each department under the 2011 program can be recognized as credits for liberal arts by track under the 2004 to 2007 program.


(3) Replacement classifications in general education for students entering in 2003 and before

* In principle, the classification of a completed course should be that of the liberal arts education program of the year when the course is completed.
* Students entering in 2003 and before are to earn no less than 13 credits in elective liberal arts and six credits in major-related liberal arts under the classifications of the program for 2003 and previous years.
* Earning credits under the new liberal arts education program
  • 1) Elective liberal arts
    - When intending to take elective liberal arts courses as defined in the program for 2003 and previous years, a course/s of distribution requirements or electives under the 2011 program without distinction of classification shall be taken.
  • 2) Major-related liberal arts
    - Major-related liberal arts (previously liberal arts by track) are excluded from liberal arts education in the 2011 program. Nevertheless, the courses of major-related liberal arts are offered as before and with the same credits. Required credits and courses are to be taken as designated by college or major.
* Recognition for classification under the 2011 program
  • - Credits earned in required fundamentals except for civic education, core courses, distribution requirements, and electives under the 2011 program can be recognized as credits for elective liberal arts under the program for 2003 and previous years.
  • - Credits earned in major-related liberal arts for each department under the 2011 program can be recognized as credits for major-related liberal arts under the program for 2003 and previous years.



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